#144 Capt. Partridge Inspired the Land-Grant Act that Shaped American Education

Jeff Dobbin 200 Things about Norwich, This Week in History

Some of our fellow military colleges like Texas A&M and Virginia Tech owe their existence to the Morrill Land-Grant Act of 1862, which gave public land for the establishment of colleges focused on practical education. The author of that legislation, Vermont Congressman Justin Morrill, lived just up the road from our own Captain Alden Partridge, who very well may have …

#143 Ann Turner – More than a Librarian

Jeff Dobbin 200 Things about Norwich, Leaders & Legacy

When Norwich University Head Librarian Ann Turner announced she would retire at the end of the 1990 academic year, she told the Northfield News, “My first reward will be a trip to Greece.” The intrepid Turner was learning Greek in preparation for the June trip, citing, “I want to be able to read the road signs.” And on citing, she …

#142 The Charlotte Nichols Greene Memorial Carillon

Jeff Dobbin 200 Things about Norwich, This Week in History

“Carillon music has the quality of floating between the earth and the sky, and a carillon is capable of effects far different than any other instrument. As body and mind accustom themselves to the new form of music, there are times when only this instrument will satisfy.” – Professor Arthur Lynds Bigelow (1909–1967) In 1934, Charlotte Nichols Greene of Boston …

#141 Sister St. Thomas: A Life Devoted to Nursing Education

Jeff Dobbin Leaders & Legacy

“Sister St. Thomas’ contribution to nursing was to turn generations of students into proficient nurses.” — Ronnie Sylvester-Palache, RN, MSN, FNP In decade of the 1980s, while the AIDS epidemic loomed large, nursing programs nationwide faced dire enrollment challenges, forcing many to shut down. Although it too was affected by the mass exodus from the nursing profession, Vermont College kept …

#140 Still Going Strong: Senator Francis K. Brooks – Vermont Public Servant Extraordinaire

Jeff Dobbin 200 Things about Norwich, Leaders & Legacy

In September of 1963, just days after watching Martin Luther King, Jr. deliver his “I Have a Dream” speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on television, Recruit Francis K. Brooks left his home outside of Washington, D.C., and arrived at Norwich for the start of his rook year. The youngest of five children born to the businessman and …

#139 WWII Campus Training Program Produced Junior Officers with a Practical Norwich Education

Jeff Dobbin 200 Things about Norwich, Military Milestones

In a previous post, we shared how the Norwich campus hosted over 1,700 trainees in the Civilian Pilot Training Program (CPTP) during World War II. Always one to rise to the occasion, the university was also one of over 200 schools that participated in the Army Specialized Training Program (ASTP) from 1943-1944. The ASTP curriculum was developed in 1942 in …

#138 The Only Accredited Architecture Program in Northern New England Follows in Alden Partridge’s Footsteps

Jeff Dobbin 200 Things about Norwich, This Week in History

In the mid-1880s, Lewis College had just transitioned back to being called Norwich University. The school had been teetering on the brink of financial collapse just a few years prior, and had been rescued by alumnus Charles Lewis. It was during this period of recovery that Norwich offered, for the first time, a Bachelor of Architecture degree. Architectural drawing had …

#137 Professor Arthur “Pop” Peach: Beloved Teacher, Proud Vermonter, Iconic Lyricist

Jeff Dobbin 200 Things about Norwich, Leaders & Legacy

Arthur Wallace “Pop” Peach was a native Vermonter to the bone, once describing himself as “hopelessly provincial.” He was born and raised in southern Vermont, graduating from Brattleboro High School and then from Middlebury College in 1904. He earned his PhD from Columbia University and later received two honorary degrees from Norwich, a master’s in 1933 and a doctorate in …

#136 “Doc” Martin, First African-American Cadet, Led the Ground School at Tuskegee Air Field

Jeff Dobbin 200 Things about Norwich, Military Milestones

Harold Douglas “Doc” Martin was a native of Roslindale, Massachusetts, who entered Norwich University as a cadet in 1916, the first African-American to do so. While at Norwich, Martin studied electrical engineering and was heavily involved in student life. He was the star of the varsity football team in addition to playing baseball and hockey. He was also in Mandolin …

#135 Thomas Seaver, Class of 1859, Demonstrated Valor at Spotsylvania Court House

Jeff Dobbin 200 Things about Norwich, Leaders & Legacy

Thomas Orville Seaver was born just before Christmas in the small town of Cavendish, Vt., in 1833, the eldest of eight children. After a year at Tufts University, he attended Norwich from 1856 to 1858. He left the university after two years and finally graduated from Union College in 1859. Seaver was in training to become a lawyer when the …