#98 Our Iconic Flagpole Was a Gift from the First Vermont Cavalry

Jeff Dobbin 200 Things about Norwich, This Week in History

The flagpole that stands outside of Jackman Hall was donated to the university in 1916 by the First Vermont Cavalry Regimental Association. Over thirty veterans of the regiment visited the university in December 1916 to formally present President Ira Reeves with the flagpole, flag, and bronze plaque. As the plaque states, the First Vermont Cavalry participated in 76 battles and …

#95 Junior Rings Keep Tradition Alive

Jeff Dobbin 200 Things about Norwich, This Week in History

By Gary Appleby ‘90 In the early days of March 1923, the senior class at Norwich University adopted one of the most cherished of all university traditions—the Norwich University Corps of Cadets class ring. While the adoption of a formally recognized class ring tradition had been discussed by several prior classes, it was the Class of 1923 which finally acted. …

#85 The Norwich Smallpox Quarantine of 1912

Jeff Dobbin 200 Things about Norwich, This Week in History

Cadet L.W. Smith had recently contracted an illness believed to be chicken pox while visiting his mother in Greenfield, Massachusetts. He was placed under “light quarantine” and nothing was thought of it until his roommate, Verner Belyea, began exhibiting clear smallpox symptoms a few days later. The first vaccine for smallpox was introduced in 1796. Though it would not be …

#79 Women Blazed the Trail at Norwich

Jeff Dobbin 200 Things about Norwich, This Week in History

Norwich University officially became co-educational in 1972 after merging with Vermont College. Two years later, Norwich admitted women into its Corps of Cadets. These women paved a path for future Norwich Women and found their way through a tough program of academic excellence, physical challenges and social change. Their story is one of courage, endurance and often humor. The 1974 …

#70 Regimental Ball, Past and Present

Bicentennial Admin Fun Facts & Stats, This Week in History

The first Regimental Ball was held in March of 1960 (the event was moved to the fall in 1964 to spread it out from Winter Carnival and Junior Ring Weekend). Coverage in the Guidon declared the first ball a great success. Miss Marilyn Adams of Colby Junior College (now Colby-Sawyer College) was crowned Queen, and over 900 attendees from Norwich and surrounding …

#63 President Schneider Becomes Our Longest Serving President

Jeff Dobbin 200 Things about Norwich, This Week in History

Alden Partridge served as president of Norwich University for 24 years, 3 months, and 5 days. On September 7, 2016, Richard Schneider will surpass this record to become our university’s longest serving president. Alden Partridge’s presidency began when the cornerstone was laid for the founding of the American Literary, Scientific, and Military Academy on August 6, 1819, the day we …

#43 Norwich is the Birthplace of ROTC

Jeff Dobbin 200 Things about Norwich, This Week in History

This month Norwich is hosting a symposium commemorating the 100th anniversary of the nation’s ROTC program. While it is commonplace today to regard Captain Partridge as the “father” of the concept of ROTC and Norwich University as the “birthplace” of that concept, there is a more direct connection that has not been previously recognized. Cavalry instruction first offered at Norwich …

#31 Making International Connections with the Russian School

Bicentennial Admin 200 Things about Norwich, This Week in History

The Russian School of Norwich University was a prestigious summer intensive program that ran for 33 years, from 1968 to 2000. Peak enrollment reached nearly 300 students as interest in Russian flourished during the Cold War years. Each summer, the campus became a hotbed of culture and activity as students from all over the country came together to learn about …

#2 Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn Played Tennis Here

Bicentennial Admin 200 Things about Norwich, This Week in History

In July 1975, famed Soviet dissident Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn visited Norwich University shortly after his exile from the USSR. The Nobel prize-winning author of The Gulag Archipelago and One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich spent 11 years in prison for criticizing his country’s policies before leaving the Soviet Union and eventually settling in Cavendish, Vt. He visited Norwich at …